Eastie

Ireland

679 posts in this topic

having read Connie's interesting comments about Irish settlers I thought I'd open this thread .

I have never been but had 5 day tour cancelled last year which really saddened me .

Would love to visit the Emerald Isle soon .

I'do like Irish music and as I type and listening to great song called the town I love so well.-very strong lyrics.

Also a fan of Irish country and Brendan Quinn amongst others.

My interest in Irish music stems back to the 70s as we had Irish neighbours and they lent me many records at the time - incidentally their dad was in the Birmingham pub bombings and sustained a broken leg .

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The Northern Irish in particular are very much misunderstood by many of our English counterparts.

While on holiday in Amadores, Gran Canaria two years ago, my fiancée and I started to speak to a elderly English couple who were having a meal at the table beside us. Due to our accents we were easily identifiable and so the conversation came around to the troubles in Northern Ireland.

Both my fiancée and I were astonished to hear the elderly couple say that they thought the Irish hated the English. Now I can understand where that comes from with many English soldiers lost to the conflict in Northern Ireland and indeed the attitude of the party as we call them the shinners.

However that is only one segment of the community here. Despite the religious persuasion in Northern Ireland the vast majority of people do not hate the English and in fact that majority wants to remain British.

It never seases to amuse me that those who want independence are now swanning around in Armani suits with wages of 60 grand per year all funded by the very Brittish state they have fought against since 1969 and indeed before that in the Easter Rising.

No most people in Northern Ireland do not hate the English. In fact if you go right back to World War One Northern Irish men fought and died alongside their English counterparts and would do so again if, God forbid, there was ever another world war.

On a brighter note Northern Ireland has some of the most beautiful scenery you will ever see around the world and indeed we are the most courteous of hosts.

Don't let the asssholes in our Assembly or the media put you off coming here. It's now a great part of the world to live in and indeed visit for a holiday.

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My holiday that was cancelled was Southern Ireland - I know Connie was over in Belfast last year and had a great time there .

I certainly intend to get there next year .

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You should take your Mrs for a few days easty , I am taking mine later this month, flights cost us a tenner each way, Ryanair from bham.

I used to go every year as a kid and took my own kids a few times when they was younger. Now it's just me and the Mrs.

We went to Belfast for the 1st time for a few days 2 years ago and had a great time. The people were so friendly all over the city. Done black taxi tour and Titanic exhibition.

And 6 months ago I was lucky enough to see the Wolftones play live in Birmingham on their 50th anniversary tour.

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You should take your Mrs for a few days easty , I am taking mine later this month, flights cost us a tenner each way, Ryanair from bham.

I used to go every year as a kid and took my own kids a few times when they was younger. Now it's just me and the Mrs.

We went to Belfast for the 1st time for a few days 2 years ago and had a great time. The people were so friendly all over the city. Done black taxi tour and Titanic exhibition.

And 6 months ago I was lucky enough to see the Wolftones play live in Birmingham on their 50th anniversary tour.

Were drink and hotel prices similar to England? I've been told Dublin is very expensive .

You are a bit of wind up merchant but you are a very decent man underneath it all- thanks for the information - much appreciated .

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Have been to the Titanic Quarter on numerous occasions Conman when attending concerts at the Odyssey Arena which is right around the corner from the Titanic Quarter. You can actually stay overnight at the Premier Inn which again is in close proximity to the Titanic Quarter and the Odyssey Arena.

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Were drink and hotel prices similar to England? I've been told Dublin is very expensive .

With the rate of the euro now Eastie it has become cheaper to stay in Dublin but compared to say any Premier Inn in Belfast it is still expensive.

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The Northern Irish in particular are very much misunderstood by many of our English counterparts.

While on holiday in Amadores, Gran Canaria two years ago, my fiancée and I started to speak to a elderly English couple who were having a meal at the table beside us. Due to our accents we were easily identifiable and so the conversation came around to the troubles in Northern Ireland.

Both my fiancée and I were astonished to hear the elderly couple say that they thought the Irish hated the English. Now I can understand where that comes from with many English soldiers lost to the conflict in Northern Ireland and indeed the attitude of the party as we call them the shinners.

However that is only one segment of the community here. Despite the religious persuasion in Northern Ireland the vast majority of people do not hate the English and in fact that majority wants to remain British.

It never seases to amuse me that those who want independence are now swanning around in Armani suits with wages of 60 grand per year all funded by the very Brittish state they have fought against since 1969 and indeed before that in the Easter Rising.

No most people in Northern Ireland do not hate the English. In fact if you go right back to World War One Northern Irish men fought and died alongside their English counterparts and would do so again if, God forbid, there was ever another world war.

On a brighter note Northern Ireland has some of the most beautiful scenery you will ever see around the world and indeed we are the most courteous of hosts.

Don't let the asssholes in our Assembly or the media put you off coming here. It's now a great part of the world to live in and indeed visit for a holiday.

Have often wondered if I went to your part of town morph whether I'd be afraid to speak or be spat upon - what you say is interesting as we grew up seeing these bombings etc on TV and thinking that Irish people hated the English .

Good to know there is more harmony nowadays .

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With the rate of the euro now Eastie it has become cheaper to stay in Dublin but compared to say any Premier Inn in Belfast it is still expensive.

We booked for 5 days for £199 including trips everyday , hotel and food but sadly it was cancelled a month before as they didn't have enough interested.it was a coach tour .

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On 01/05/2015 at 11:12 AM, Morpheus said:

Have been to the Titanic Quarter on numerous occasions Conman when attending concerts at the Odyssey Arena which is right around the corner from the Titanic Quarter. You can actually stay overnight at the Premier Inn which again is in close proximity to the Titanic Quarter and the Odyssey Arena.

We were staying in the cathedral quarter premier inn  and walked to Titanic and walked past the oddessy and that premier inn. And we also done the crumlin rd gaol tour.

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Have often wondered if I went to your part of town morph whether I'd be afraid to speak or be spat upon - what you say is interesting as we grew up seeing these bombings etc on TV and thinking that Irish people hated the English .

Good to know there is more harmony nowadays .

That's exactly why I posted what I did.

It's a very different part of the world now mate since those days. Like any city however there are still back street areas where you wouldn't want to go into but those are very few and far between now.

Part of the problem years ago was the media and I include our own in that. Reporters would actually pay a group of youngsters to throw stones at passing Police cars or Landrovers just to take photographs.

All the English public ever seen from Northern Ireland was bombings, riots or another soldier being shot. That was the main focus of reporters because that had obviously far more impact than showing the better side of Northern Ireland which was the normal person in the street or the scenery in our country.

Thankfully since the Good Friday Agreement most of that has stopped and the focus is on showing the better side of our country and the majority of its people.

I'm not trying to suggest for one minute that it wasn't bad here during those days because it was but in only certain parts of Northern Ireland and certainly not widespread.

Mate if you ever get the chance to come over you'll not be disappointed as Conman has alluded to.

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We found the prices of food and drink expensive in Belfast city centre

Even now with a good Euro exchange rate  Dublin is the same.

But I don't worry about things like that

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We were staying in the cathedral quarter premier inn morph and walked to Titanic and walked past the oddessy and that premier inn. And we also done the crumlin rd gaol tour.

Yes mate I know it well.

You should also try the Premier Inn beside the Titanic Quarter. Really nice staff, good food and plenty to do. I've noted a lot of Americans and Japenese tourists around the Titanic quarter with their cameras. Its a photographers dream there. If I can find a way to do it I will post some snaps I have taken around the Titanic Quarter here later.

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Interesting information - I have made holiday plans for this year but will be looking at Ireland next year as my holiday close to home .

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Yes mate I know it well.

You should also try the Premier Inn beside the Titanic Quarter. Really nice staff, good food and plenty to do. I've noted a lot of Americans and Japenese tourists around the Titanic quarter with their cameras. Its a photographers dream there. If I can find a way to do it I will post some snaps I have taken around the Titanic Quarter here later.

Can you slip a pic of those 2 blondes you were telling me about too ;)

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dublin is not much to look at if u ask me, its the banter of the people which make dublin, or even that case ireland. u can walk around looking at history all day but tbh, its the laughter and the heart of the irish ppl that when i was away i missed the most.

walks along dun laoghaire pier, or up killiney hill are brilliant. maybe because i live here and i have it at my finger tips i take it for granted. but realisticly, the friendliness is what makes it a really nice place.

north or south of the border makes really no difference to how genuine and decent folks are. its just the meaningful politeness that u get off folks. ofcourse though, everywhere has dickheads too :)

edit: in about an hour im going to the giants causeway, well im taking the missus up there, she can stay up there while im in the bushmills distillery lol

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Can you slip a pic of those 2 blondes you were telling me about too ;)

For your eyes only mate.

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dublin is not much to look at if u ask me, its the banter of the people which make dublin, or even that case ireland. u can walk around looking at history all day but tbh, its the laughter and the heart of the irish ppl that when i was away i missed the most.

walks along dun laoghaire pier, or up killiney hill are brilliant. maybe because i live here and i have it at my finger tips i take it for granted. but realisticly, the friendliness is what makes it a really nice place.

north or south of the border makes really no difference to how genuine and decent folks are. its just the meaningful politeness that u get off folks. ofcourse though, everywhere has dickheads too :)

edit: in about an hour im going to the giants causeway, well im taking the missus up there, she can stay up there while im in the bushmills distillery lol

Totally agree about the people mate but Ireland really is a beautiful country to look at if you are in the right places, the Giants Causeway being just one of many.
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Belfast is a place I love and always have but it's a whole new world now. The hospitality is second to none, great food and plenty to do. Anyone going that far has to see the Giant's Causeway and surrounding areas. I am well travelled and you'd be hard pushed to beat the scenery. I would recommend the Radisson by the old gasworks or the Fitzwilliam. Have stayed in both numerous times.

People misunderstand a lot of things about the troubles in general. People seem to think catholics and protestants hate one another, which isn't the case and never was.

I consider myself very fortunate to have had very open-minded parents and to have lived in a mixed community. As in England, very few in Northern Ireland give a monkey's about what religion you are.

The level of misunderstanding in England, even now, astounds me.

As a teenager, I couldn't wait to leave Northern Ireland. I don't regret doing so for a second because it can be quite insular but now I cannot wait to go back permanently.

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Belfast is a place I love and always have but it's a whole new world now. The hospitality is second to none, great food and plenty to do. Anyone going that far has to see the Giant's Causeway and surrounding areas. I am well travelled and you'd be hard pushed to beat the scenery. I would recommend the Radisson by the old gasworks or the Fitzwilliam. Have stayed in both numerous times.

People misunderstand a lot of things about the troubles in general. People seem to think catholics and protestants hate one another, which isn't the case and never was.

I consider myself very fortunate to have had very open-minded parents and to have lived in a mixed community. As in England, very few in Northern Ireland give a monkey's about what religion you are.

The level of misunderstanding in England, even now, astounds me.

As a teenager, I couldn't wait to leave Northern Ireland. I don't regret doing so for a second because it can be quite insular but now I cannot wait to go back permanently.

My best friends are protestants Anne and all salt of the earth. We can even give each other stick about the other's religion which is always good natured and indeed most of the population of Northern Ireland are like that.

Furthermore my family and I were part of a social housing experiment at the height of the troubles in 1973 bringing both communities to live together in one housing estate and it worked because the people who were housed there didn't give a toss about politics or which colour of flag you flew at certain times of the year. There was no such thing as celebrated culture just people getting on with their lives and that's the way it should always be.

Good to hear that you are contemplating coming back again sometime. :)

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My best friends are protestants Anne and all salt of the earth. We can even give each other stick about the other's religion which is always good natured and indeed most of the population of Northern Ireland are like that.

Furthermore my family and I were part of a social housing experiment at the height of the troubles in 1973 bringing both communities to live together in one housing estate and it worked because the people who were housed there didn't give a toss about politics or which colour of flag you flew at certain times of the year. There was no such thing as celebrated culture just people getting on with their lives and that's the way it should always be.

Good to hear that you are contemplating coming back again sometime. :)

Apart from a select few binlids, most people are like that at home, to be fair.

Someone at work asked me why I wasn't having a church wedding. I explained that apart from a few other things neither of us are religious and D is a Protestant anyhow. She said she thought we hated one another then, in all seriousness, said that all she knew of the situation in Northern Ireland was what she had read at school in 'Across the Barricades'. I couldn't stop laughing.

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Sweet Jesus. :rolleyes:

I think you've actually hit the nail on the head. Misinformation or just an ignorance of what the people are really like in Northern Ireland which has contributed to the mentality I found on holiday.

Again on a brighter note a few golfing buddies and I were ready to tee off for a round at Royal Portrush when behind us we could hear an American couple exclaim 'it's always so green here Harry!' One of my mates who wasn't in a good mood stated under his breath 'that's because it f**king rains here all the time.' :lol:

However when you get the weather you'd be hard pushed to get better scenery anywhere else.

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def is a beautiful place. For quite a few guys over at the Lions Doo in Carrickfergus last year, it was their first time in Northern Ireland, and they couldn't believe how nice it was. They said they were expecting it to be a tip, but were pleasantly surprised. I think they expected everyone to live in farmyards and have leprechauns at the bottom of the garden! Quite a few didn't go because they all thought everyone hated the English over here lol.

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Are you looking to move back Anne or just wishful thinking?

We will be moving back sooner rather than later, Eastie.

D doesn't like London life very much and I tired of it years ago. Overall, it's much more practical for us to be there than here.

Only problem is there's no work for teachers and I do love my job.

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